Amazing Tim Locksmith

Elm Grove, Brookfield, Milwaukee

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You may need this when you call a locksmith.

Posted on 23 February, 2020 at 0:55 Comments comments (8)

If you need to call a locksmith because you are locked out of the house or car, there is some information that you will need to provide while requesting service and when the locksmith arrives on site. Some of this information will vary based on the specific situation, but you should be prepared to at least think about the answers to these questions. Here is an overview of what information your locksmith will request and what to look for in a locksmith.

 

Proof of Ownership

 

Locksmiths are only able to open locks for the property that you own. If you understand how locksmiths check ownership, you can be prepared to have the right documentation available that you need. A photo identification card or a bill with an address that matches another photo ID can be enough for some locksmiths to open up a residential house. Some locksmiths are able to pull property tax records to verify ownership. If you rent, it could be more complicated, as you may need to call your landlord to get permission to unlock the property. If you have any questions about what proof of documentation you will need, be sure to discuss this process with the locksmith in advance.

 

Type of Lock

 

When you call the locksmith, be sure to mention the type of lock that you need to be opened. This includes smart locks, car locks, deadbolts, and padlocks. Not all locksmiths provide service to all types of locks. You can save time and energy by ensuring that the locksmith you call can provide the service that you need.

 

Brand of Lock

 

If possible, you can also let your locksmith know about the brand of lock that you need to be opened. Some brands of locks have special tools available that can make the process even easier. If your locksmith knows about the brand in advance, they can bring that correct tools with them.

 

Alternative Entry Points

 

Be sure to let your locksmith know if there are alternative entry points available. You may not realize that, but an alternative entry point might be easier to access than the one being serviced. Even if you are not able to gain access to your home from an alternative entry point, it is still worth letting your locksmith know. You never know what information could help.

 

Do You Have A Key?

 

Many people call a locksmith because they have been locked out of their car or home. Sometimes, they are locked out because a key is stuck. If this is the case, be sure to let your locksmith know on the phone that you have a key but it isn’t working. They may need to bring different tools with them.

IS YOUR KEY STUCK IN LOCK?

Posted on 30 November, 2019 at 0:25 Comments comments (5)

When you least expect it, your key can get stuck in your door. It can seem like an impossible task to get the key back out. Fortunately, there are some strategies that you can use to get your key out of your door and to repair the lock so it doesn’t happen again.

 

Use Spray Lubricant

 

Most often, a key becomes stuck in a door lock because the lock isn’t well lubricated. If you have access to a can of spray lubricant, you can spray it into the lock and then try to remove the key. For many people, they don’t have access to spray lubricant in the front of their home, so this won’t necessarily help them. Usually, it’s kept inside a utility closet or a garage, if they have it at all. If you have neighbors nearby, it might be worth asking them if they have spray lubricant that you can borrow to get your key out of the door.

 

Jiggle the Key

 

You can also try to jiggle the key inside of the lock to see if you can dislodge it. However, don’t pull too hard, as the force can force the key further against the lock pins. This can make it even more difficult to get the key out of the lock. A slight movement in a different direction could dislodge the key and make it easier to remove.

 

Apply Ice or a Cold Pack

 

Applying ice or a cold pack to the door lock and key could help to make the key easier to remove from the lock. The cold could contract the metal in the key to make it slightly smaller and easier to remove. Just be cautious that the ice doesn’t wet the key or the lock. This trick works best when it’s hot outside.

 

Hold the Lock with One Hand

 

You could also try to hold the lock with one hand while unlocking it with the other. While turning the lock, stabilize the lock with your hand. This can create enough resistance and stability to help you get the key out. If you can’t fit your entire hand on the lock, you might be able to stabilize it with your finger.

 

Call a Professional Locksmith

 

If none of these tips help you to dislodge your key from the lock on your door, it is time to call a professional locksmith for an emergency lockout service. Not only are you likely locked out of your home, the key being stuck in the door creates additional security risks. What if you leave the key in the door to spend time inside a neighbor’s home and someone else gains access to your home through dislodging the key?

 

 

Do you want the same key to work the dead bolt lock and the door handle lock?

Posted on 6 September, 2019 at 14:15 Comments comments (11)

When homeowners move into their new property for the first time, it is a smart idea to have the keys changed over. For homes with deadbolts and separate door locks, many homeowners wonder if they should have the locks keyed to use one key for both locks or to have separate keys. Here are some things to consider about whether your deadbolt and door lock should open with the same key.

Be Realistic About Your Lifestyle.

No matter what you’re deciding between, it is important to be realistic about your lifestyle before making a decision that impacts your home. If you’re prone to losing your keys, needing to find a second key in the morning wouldn’t be a great idea. However, if you prioritize extra security and invest what you can into securing your home, it could make a lot of sense. 

Separate Keys are More Secure Than One Key.

As long as you don’t give access to both keys at the same time, separate keys are technically more secure than having a single key. If you lose one of the keys, you won’t have to worry about someone gaining access to your house. However, if you keep both keys together on a key ring, you’ll likely lose both keys at the same time. If someone can use the two separate keys, it isn’t any more secure than having a single key.

May Not Be Necessary.

What kind of personal possessions do you have in your home? What kind of neighborhood do you live in? If you maintain a home office with highly confidential documentation, taking the extra steps necessary to lock the deadbolt and door lock with different keys might make sense. If your neighborhood has a high crime rate, having separate keys could be a way to keep your home even more secure. For people with minimal personal possessions in a crime-free neighborhood or an active security system, it is understandable to not want to deal with having two separate keys.

What Happens if You Lose One.

If you happen to lose just one of your keys, you will still need to call a professional locksmith to get back into your house. Since you would have locked both the deadbolt and the door lock with separate keys, one key won’t allow you to open the door. In some ways, this can successfully secure your home from even its owners.

Locks

Posted on 6 July, 2019 at 11:40 Comments comments (10)

Pin and Tumbler Locks

Pin and tumbler locks are exceptionally common. The mechanism contains a set of spring-loaded pins inside small cylinders. When the key is inserted, it compresses the springs, aligning the space between the bottom and top pins around a track known as the shear line. When the shear line is clear, the key will turn. The compression of an incorrect key will misalign at least one pin, blocking the shear line and preventing the key from turning.

Tubular Locks

The tubular lock is a specific type of pin and tumbler lock named for its unique circular key. A rectangular notch on the key matches a similar hole on the lock for proper insertion. Tubular locks are most often found on items that are left unattended for long periods, such as ATMs, vending machines, and glass display cabinets in retail stores.

Rim Locks

Rim locks are common on older homes but are not frequently used today. They are among the oldest types of locks, and are surface mounted onto the door. A rim lock generally uses a simple latch mechanism, with obstructions known as wards inside the keyhole to prevent the wrong key from being used.

Mortise Locks

A mortise lock is installed in a pocket, known as a mortise, that is cut into the door. Mortise locks may use simple latches or high security deadbolts. They are strong, durable and, depending on features, may be extremely secure.

Electronic Locks

Electronic door locks are arguably the biggest evolution in the history of locks. An electronic lock uses an actuator to connect the mechanical lock parts to a small motor buried inside the door or frame. The motor is activated by electrical impulse, which may be delivered by a keypad, an electronic card reader, or even a wireless remote sensor. The lock will not open until it receives the proper electrical signal. However, manual bypasses are generally available to guard against electrical failure.

About Locks

Posted on 11 May, 2019 at 9:55 Comments comments (8)

Best Locks to Prevent Home Burglaries

Door locks create the vital first line of defense in protecting your home against burglars. Yet not all locks are the same, making it extremely important to choose just the right lock for each door. Here is what you should know to choose the best locks to prevent home burglaries.

Best Locks to Prevent Burglaries

Deadbolt Locks

A doorknob lock is a good way to deter casual intruders, though it will provide almost no defense against a determined burglar. A doorknob lock has a keyed lock cylinder outside and a simple lever that you turn inside. The lock stops the doorknob from turning, but it is easy to pick. It also can’t stop an intruder from kicking in the door or knocking the handle off with a hammer. Always lock your doorknob locks, but pair them with something stronger like a deadbolt.

Deadbolts

As the name implies, a deadbolt uses a strong metal bolt to secure the door to the door frame. Single cylinder deadbolts are keyed on the outside but use a turning lever inside. They are the easiest to open from inside in the event of a fire or other emergency, but if you have windows by the door, a burglar could simply break a window, reach in, and unlock the door.

Double cylinder deadbolts are keyed on both sides, making it impossible for a burglar to reach in and unlock them. They are considered more secure than single cylinder deadbolts, but for your family’s safety, it is important to keep a key near the door and make sure all family members know where to find it.

Keypad Locks

Mechanically, keypad locks function like any other door lock. The difference is that you do not have to worry about losing or forgetting your key. Some keypad locks are smart locks that can tie into a complete home security system. As long as you change the code regularly and do not select an easily guessed code, keypad locks can be quite secure. However, they are only as good as their mechanical and electrical components, so make sure you choose only highly rated keypad locks.

Physical Barriers

Some security experts recommend backing up your door locks with physical barriers such as bars, bolts, or chains. These solutions can dramatically slow down a burglar, but all can be overcome with brute force. They may also slow down your family’s escape in the event of an emergency. Weigh your options carefully, taking all relevant factors into account. If you do add a physical barrier, it should be used only as a backup for a strong, secure lock.

The reality is that no lock or barrier is 100% burglar proof. Home burglary is largely a crime of opportunity, though, and the precautions you take may be enough to convince a would-be thief to move on to an easier target. Consider adding a monitored home security system as well for more complete protection.


Watch out for intruders

Posted on 26 April, 2019 at 15:10 Comments comments (8)

Ways to Reduce Your Risk of an Office Intruder

Office theft runs the gamut from employees stealing supplies to burglars gaining access after-hours. In a commercial building, it only makes sense to be extra-cautious, no matter how comfortable you might feel. Here are some ways that employees, managers, and building owners can work together to reduce the risks.ways to deter office theft

Employees

When you’re at work, keep your personal items safe. Your purse, keys, wallet, cell phone, and other valuable items are small, easy targets. Carry them around with you or lock them in a secure closet or drawer.

Check the identity of anyone you don’t recognize in your office. Ask who they are and who they are visiting. Check your office policy on visitors and make sure they follow the rules, such as signing in or always being accompanied by an escort.

Separate your personal life from your work life. If you are discussing plans for the weekend or your upcoming vacation with coworkers, make sure no clients or visitors are within earshot. Not only is it unprofessional, but you never know what a stranger’s intentions might be.

Try not to take the stairs alone. Don’t get in an elevator with anyone who seems threatening. It’s better to wait a few moments than to put yourself in a risky situation.

Avoid dimly lit stairwells, corridors, and parking lots. If you are working late, let someone know where you are and when you are leaving. Create an action plan to get safely to your car or public transit, and never let a stranger into the office after business hours.

Report broken doors, windows, or locks immediately. Never assume that someone else already did.

Managers

Be careful and diligent in the hiring process. Perform pre-employment background checks on everyone, and periodic checks on employees in high-risk operations. The more thorough your screening process, the less likely you will fall victim to an inside job.

Conduct regular security audits to identify potential weaknesses. Many security companies offer these audits free of charge. Work with a professional to develop a plan of action that fits your company’s needs and budget.

Consider upgrading access control procedures to ensure that the only people who can get into your office are those who belong there. For example, you might use badge scanners on rooms that contain sensitive equipment, an intercom system for visitors, and vandal-proof hardware on exterior doors. Your security professional can help you decide what makes sense for your business.

Think about installing surveillance equipment. You need to be careful not to make your employees and customers feel distrusted, or to do anything that could be considered spying, but a basic camera system can be a deterrent. If you do have an issue, camera footage can help bring a thief to justice.

Conduct regular employee security training. Besides learning to keep themselves and their belongings safe from harm, your employees can also play an important role in protecting your company’s equipment and data. Hold training classes at least once per year, and pass along helpful security tips by email now and then.

Building Owners

Commercial building owners have both moral and legal responsibilities to their tenants. Hire a security professional to conduct a full building assessment and make recommendations. At a minimum, all exterior doors should have deadbolts and all windows must be secure. High security locks or electronic access-control units with secure key bypass systems are even better.

Reduce shadowy areas around the building by adding lights and trimming shrubs, and install both constant and motion-control lighting near access points. Restrooms should have high-security locks, and only employees should have keys or codes. If you have a building-wide receptionist, the desk should be equipped with a panic button.



Key Won't Turn?

Posted on 16 March, 2019 at 11:05 Comments comments (518)

Key Won’t Turn?

First, double check that you are using the right key. Many keys look similar, and it is not unusual to mix them up. If you are sure the key is correct, the lock could be dirty and filled with debris. During winter weather, it could literally be frozen. Try using a de-icing agent to thaw a frozen lock, or lubricate a dirty lock with graphite. You may need to put the key in and jiggle it around a few times to loosen up the lock.

Another possibility is that the key is worn down. Over time, the edges of a key can become too smooth to turn the lock. If you have a duplicate, see if it works, and then replace the key that is no longer working. Likewise, a brand new key could have rough spots left over from the manufacturing process that could get stuck in the lock. Carefully file down those spots, taking care to remove only the tiniest bit of metal at a time.

Scammers

Posted on 15 March, 2019 at 11:00 Comments comments (8)

This Profession Has a Lot of Scammers

Although most locksmiths are professional, reliable, and trustworthy, the profession does draw its share of scam artists. Make sure the locksmith answers the phone with an actual business name, not just “locksmith service,” and that they have a local address. Ask a few questions over the phone to weed out people who know nothing about the profession. When the locksmith arrives, check his or her ID and request a written estimate.

Facts to Know

Posted on 4 March, 2019 at 0:20 Comments comments (7)

Buying a Locked Safe Is Almost Always a Waste

Who doesn’t love a good mystery, a treasure hunt, and the prospect of riches untold? If you run across an old, locked safe at a flea market or secondhand store, odds are good that it will rouse your curiosity and fire up your imagination. Before you take it home, though, come back to reality. It will likely cost you hundreds of dollars to open the safe, and the chances of finding anything inside, let alone anything valuable, are extremely remote. If you like the safe and plan to use it, and you are willing to part with the money to open it, go ahead. But if you’re expecting to find a lost fortune, back away slowly.


Stamping “Do Not Duplicate” on a Key Doesn’t Stop Duplication

A reputable locksmith will not duplicate a key that is marked in this manner, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be done. Many “do no duplicate” keys are extremely easy to duplicate, and all it takes is an enterprising DIYer or an inattentive clerk at a big box store. Protect yourself by choosing high security locks that cannot be duplicated on standard hardware store equipment.


Common Safe Mistakes

If your safe doesn’t open, it could have a problem. Or you could be doing something wrong. The most common mistakes people make with their safes include trying to open the safe before it is unlocked, spinning the dial too quickly, and forcing it closed. Slow down, back up, and try again.

Alexa Unlock

Posted on 20 January, 2019 at 20:15 Comments comments (7)

Yale Turns Voices Into Keys With Alexa Unlock

Lock, unlock and check current lock status by just asking Alexa! As the world welcomes Alexa’s voice control convenience into their hearts, homes and businesses, smart lock manufacturers like Yale are turning voices into keys. Yale Locks & Hardware has unveiled support for Amazon Alexa with the addition of voice unlocking for its Assure Lock® […]


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